Building Effective Decision-Making Skills Exercise Overview Decision-making skills include the…

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Building Effective Decision-Making Skills

Exercise Overview

Decision-making skills include the ability to recognize and define problems or opportunities and then select the proper course of action. This exercise provides a format for analyzing the phases in a decision-making process. As you’ll see, the condition prompting the decision can be characterized as either a problem or an opportunity.

Exercise Task

At the risk of oversimplifying, let’s begin by supplementing our discussion of “Force Field Analysis” on page 357 by dividing the process of change making—both personal and organizational—into three broad phases:

1. Unfreezing: Recognizing the need for change—identifying the problem(s) that make change necessary

2. Changing: Making the change—designing and implementing a plan for a new way of doing things 3. Refreezing: Locking in the change—replacing old attitudes and behaviors with new ones that become just as habitual Step 1: Individual Preparation This step should be done in writing. Think of a change at work or in your personal life that you would like to make. Now develop a plan for making it, using the three phases of the change process:

1. Unfreezing: Briefly describe the change and explain why you think it’s needed.

2. Changing: Decide upon a date on which you intend to initiate the change and a date by which you want to feel that you’ve accomplished your goal. Describe your plan for making the change.

3.Refreezing: Describe your plans for maintaining the change. Step 2: In‑Class Exercise (10–30 minutes) Your instructor will choose an in-class procedure from among these two options:

• Option A: Break the class into three to six groups in which members share their plans and offer suggestions for improvement.

• Option B: Break the class into three to six groups in which members share their plans. The group selects its best plan to be shared with the class. Each group shares its best plan with the class. Your instructor may offer some concluding remarks. Step 3: Application (2–4 minutes) This step should be done in writing. Respond to the following questions:

• What did I learn from this experience?

• How will I use the knowledge that I gained in the future? You may also want to restate the dates in your original plan. Adapted from Robert N. Lussier and Christopher F. Achua, Leadership: Theory, Application, and Skill Development, 4th ed. (Mason, OH: South-Western Cengage Learning, 2010), pp. 435–438, 448.

 

 

 

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