Discussion: Comparing Existential-Humanistic Therapy to Other Types of TherapyUnderstanding the strengths of each type of therapy and which type of therapy is most appropriate for each client is an es

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Discussion: Comparing Existential-Humanistic Therapy to Other Types of TherapyUnderstanding the strengths of each type of therapy and which type of therapy is most appropriate for each client is an essential skill of the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner. In this Discussion, you will compare Existential-Humanistic therapy to a therapy you select from the previous weeks of this course. You will identify the strengths and challenges of each and describe a fictional client that you think is best suited for each.Learning ObjectivesStudents will: Compare types of psychotherapyTo prepare: Review this week’s Learning Resources Review this week’s media and consider the insights provided. Review the other types of psychotherapy presented in this course and select the one that resonates with you the most at this timeNote: For this Discussion, you are required to complete your initial post before you will be able to view and respond to your colleagues’ postings. Begin by clicking on the “Post to Discussion Question” link and then select “Create Thread” to complete your initial post. Remember, once you click Submit, you cannot delete or edit your own posts, and cannot post anonymously. Please check your post carefully before clicking Submit!By Day 3Posta summary of the psychotherapy that you selected and explain why it resonates with you the most at this time. Then compare the psychotherapy you selected with existential-humanistic therapy. What are the strengths and challenges of each type of psychotherapy? Describe a fictional client that you think would be best suited for the therapy you selected and one fictional client you think would be best suited for existential-humanistic therapy. Explain why.Note: Do not use a client’s actual name.Note: Nurse practitioners must have strong oral communication skills. This Discussion is designed to help you hone these skills. When filming your Kaltura video, be sure to dress and speak in a professional manner.

Discussion: Comparing Existential-Humanistic Therapy to Other Types of TherapyUnderstanding the strengths of each type of therapy and which type of therapy is most appropriate for each client is an es
Clinical Supervision Follow -up Clinical Supervision Follow -up Program Transcript WILLIAM: I came here because I promised my brother and sister-in-law that I’d try therapy. I wasn’t happy about it. I mean, I figured, how can someone who doesn’t even know me at all actually help me with anything? Plus, everyone slams the VA docs as not really caring, so it’s come as quite a surprise to me that I actually feel comfortable talking with you. It’s l ike– it’s like you get me. And you seem to understand some of what I lived through over there. I can’t tell you what it’s like to not have to try to explain what war is like to a civilian. All the stupid questions I get since I’m back. Like did you ev er have to shoot anyone? What was that like? Man, how stupid can you be? Anyway. To recap– last week, I was telling you about my buddy and I, and how we got ambushed and how he got blown up in our Humvee. I sometimes still wonder why he’s dead and I’m still here. It’s damn unfair. In a funny wa y, to both of us. Anyway, his parents seem to take comfort in talking to me about him. And I was fine with that, at first. It seemed only right that I should be the one to share t he details of their son’s death. But I can’t keep reliving this. And every time they call, they want me t o come over and talk about it. It eats me up inside. It’s too much. MALE SPEAKER: Go on. Is there anything more you want to say about that? WILLIAM: Well, what do you have to say about what I just told you? MALE SPEAKER: Well, it sounds like you feel a lot of loyalty towards you r buddy who died, and you want to somehow be there for his parents. But it’s excruciating for you to talk about him and be reminded about what happened every time you see them. Is that about right? WILLIAM: Yeah. That’s about right. So what should I do? MALE SPEAKER: What do you think you want to do? WILLIAM: I want to not have to relive all the horrifying things I went thr ough over there. But then I think about my buddy’s parents, and talking to them, a nd I- – MALE SPEAKER: You just don’t know which pulls you more? © 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 Clinical Supervision Follow-up WILLIAM: Yeah. So what should I do? MALE SPEAKER: Well, I can’t tell you what to do. But I think maybe deep down, you may already know what it is you want to do. Do you? WILLIAM: No, dammit. That’s why I’m asking you. Do you guys really get p aid to say this sort of stuff? MALE SPEAKER: I understand this is extremely distressing for you. But- – WILLIAM: No, I’ll tell you what’s distressing, Doc. Watching my buddy di e right in front of me. This talking stuff is crap. It’s not helping me, and it’s a total waste of my time. MALE SPEAKER: I know you’re in a lot of pain, William. The thing about t herapy is, it often doesn’t feel like it’s working in the early stages, because you’re bringing up a lot of that hard stuff that you buried for so long. And it hurts. It can be very upsetting to look at. WILLIAM: Well, that’s a convenient excuse as to why I don’t feel better. MALE SPEAKER: Well, it also happens to be the truth. William, I have nev er lied to you. I promise you, I never will. WILLIAM: I feel like I can trust you, Doc. While I haven’t exactly felt good, there have been times here where I felt comfortable for the first time since c oming back. That’s something, right? MALE SPEAKER: Right. WILLIAM: So my sister-in-law, Rosita, and my brother, Henry, they say that I yell a lot while I’m sleeping. My wife, Luly Kim, she used to say the same th ing when we were sleeping together. But I don’t wake myself up, so I don’t know i f it’s really happening. I don’t know. Maybe it’s their plan to try to get me in here. That’s what I think. MALE SPEAKER: Do you remember any dreams or nightmares? WILLIAM: No. MALE SPEAKER: Really? WILLIAM: No, I’m lying. [LAUGHS] How do you know when I’m full of it, Do c? MALE SPEAKER: I don’t know, but sometimes I get a feeling. © 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. 2 Clinical Supervision Follow -up WILLIAM: You better watch out for them feelings. MALE SPEAKER: Because feelings are dangerous, right? WILLIAM: Damn straight. MALE SPEAKER: Why don’t you tell me a little more about those feelings a bout talking to Jimmy’s parents about him. WILLIAM: Intense dread. Resentment. Like I want to run away from everyth ing. MALE SPEAKER: Sounds like you’re really in touch with those feelings. I mean, they really right there for you, aren’t they? WILLIAM: Yeah, I suppose. MALE SPEAKER: So, you have an option. You can either approach these feelings or avoid them. Which do you think you want to do? WILLIAM: Avoid, of course. You kidding me? MALE SPEAKER: I’m asking seriously. I mean, you can avoid them. It’s wha t you’ve been doing. It’s an option. But how’s that been working out for y ou so far? Well? WILLIAM: Sort of. To a point. Then I think about my buddy Jimmy’s parent s, and how he would want me to talk them, and I get all tied up in knots inside . It’s like I know what I want to do, but I just– I just can’t. MALE SPEAKER: It sounds like you want to talk to Jimmy’s parents about h im because it’s what Jimmy would have wanted. WILLIAM: Yeah. I mean, it’s what Jimmy would have wanted, and it’s– it’s what I want, too. Well, you suck, Doc. How’d you get me to do that? MALE SPEAKER: Think I have a way to make you cry? WILLIAM: Don’t you? MALE SPEAKER: I think when you talk about feelings, sometimes they come out. And the sad ones sometimes bring tears. WILLIAM: Sounds like a lot of psychobabble to me. I think you have a but ton hidden on you somewhere, and you press it and the patient cries. MALE SPEAKER: Well, that would save you some time. © 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. 3 Clinical Supervision Follow -up WILLIAM: Yeah. I’m going to stop now. I mean, for today, I mean. I’m wip ed out, Doc. Is that normal? MALE SPEAKER: It’s absolutely normal. Letting emotions bubble up a littl e bit at a time like this is the best way to move forward without overwhelming yo u. But it can still be emotionally exhausting. You may find yourself wanting to sl eep, and that’s OK. We can stop for today. WILLIAM: Good. MALE SPEAKER: One last question for you, though. WILLIAM: OK. Go ahead. MALE SPEAKER: Have you been having any suicidal thoughts? I mean, it cou ld be the kind where you think you might act on it, or it can be the kind w here you know you won’t. WILLIAM: I think about killing myself a lot. But I don’t have any intent on it. I mean, it’s more of just, like, an escape valve, for disappearing. It is not something that I’d do to my wife and my brother and sister-in-law and the whole family. I mean, no t after all that they’ve done for me. So, nah. MALE SPEAKER: And if that changes? WILLIAM: What do you mean? MALE SPEAKER: Well, if you have a change of heart, will you call me if y ou start thinking about killing yourself more seriously? WILLIAM: Would you want me to call you? MALE SPEAKER: Yes. Absolutely. Here’s my direct line, so you’ll have it. Any time, day or night. OK? WILLIAM: OK, Doc. I mean, I’m not planning on killing myself or anyone e lse any time soon, but if I do, I’ll let you know. MALE SPEAKER: Good. WILLIAM: So, see you Thursday? MALE SPEAKER: Thursday it is. WILLIAM: Thanks. © 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. 4 Clinical Supervision Follow -up MALE SPEAKER: See you then. WILLIAM: Yeah. © 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. 5
Discussion: Comparing Existential-Humanistic Therapy to Other Types of TherapyUnderstanding the strengths of each type of therapy and which type of therapy is most appropriate for each client is an es
On a Hamster Wheel On a Hamster Wheel Program Transcript FEMALE SPEAKER: I don’t know what else to do. My client, Reggie, he’s ju st not making progress. I look at the treatment goals I set up for him, and I j ust don’t feel like I’m helping him. You know? I want to be a good therapist, but- – FEMALE SPEAKER: Well you’ve been working with Reggie for, what, three months now? Tell me more about your interventions. What’s going on in yo ur sessions with him? FEMALE SPEAKER: I’ve given him homework. I’ve changed his treatment modalities. I’ve gone back and reestablished rapport with him. Nothing works. He’s just not making progress. I feel like I don’t know what I’m doing a nymore. FEMALE SPEAKER: It feels like you’re running on a hamster wheel, doesn’t it? I’ve been there with clients like that myself. And we all have. But I think you are making progress. Look how you haven’t given up? That’s what a good thera pist does. Look, I hear your concerns loud and clear. Now it’s time for me to suppo rt your efforts. OK? FEMALE SPEAKER: OK. FEMALE SPEAKER: Good. Then let’s talk about some other approaches that you might use. All right with you? FEMALE SPEAKER: Absolutely. FEMALE SPEAKER: Good. Well, here’s an idea. When I’ve had a client who’s been a little bit slow in coming along— On a Hamster Wheel Additional Content Att ribution MUSIC: Creative Support Services Los Angeles, CA Dimension Sound Effects Library Newnan, GA Narrator Tracks Music Library © 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. 1 On a Ham ster Wheel Stevens Point, WI Signature Music, Inc Chesterton, IN Studio Cutz Music Library Carrollton, TX © 2016 Laureate Education, Inc. 2

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