Assignment: EHR Project Plan Draft (Course Project Part 2) TIP: Please see the Rubric, in the attachment, for specific detailed instruction for this assignment. Based on the EHR Project case described

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Assignment: EHR Project Plan Draft (Course Project Part 2)

TIP: Please see the Rubric, in the attachment, for specific detailed instruction for this assignment.

Based on the EHR Project case described in Module 01, write a 5-6-page project plan draft. This project plan should include the following:

  • Description of the overall and specific goals for the project, including an explanation of the overall goal and the approximate scope of the project.
  • Description of the organization, and its characteristics and climate in which the project will be deployed.
  • A breakdown of the project lifecycle, explaining what will take place during each phase and who will be involved. This portion needs to demonstrate understanding and application of each of the project lifecycle phases to the Good Apples Group project. What tasks will occur at each stage?

Save your assignment as a Microsoft Word document. APA format with In-text citations for references.

EHR Project case described in Module 01:

In order to complete this project, click on the link below to review and print the Good Apples Group Case. This document describes the Good Apples Group facility, the way they do business, and the need they have for an EHRS. Each component of the project is based on the needs of the Good Apples Group. You will be building a plan for delivering an EHRS system to Good Apples Group.

  • Good Apples Group Case
  • If the above link will not open, please copy and paste the link below into a browser:

https://content.learntoday.info/Learn/HI300_Spring_14/site/Media/Good%20Apples%20Group%20Case.doc

Assignment: EHR Project Plan Draft (Course Project Part 2) TIP: Please see the Rubric, in the attachment, for specific detailed instruction for this assignment. Based on the EHR Project case described
Week 4- Assignment, Rubric, & Lesson Content Assignment: EHR Project Plan Draft (Course Project Part 2) TIP: Please see the Rubric, in the attachment, for specific detailed instruction for this assignment. Based on the EHR Project case described in Module 01, write a 5-6-page project plan draft. This project plan should include the following: Description of the overall and specific goals for the project, including an explanation of the overall goal and the approximate scope of the project. Description of the organization, and its characteristics and climate in which the project will be deployed. A breakdown of the project lifecycle, explaining what will take place during each phase and who will be involved. This portion needs to demonstrate understanding and application of each of the project lifecycle phases to the Good Apples Group project. What tasks will occur at each stage? Save your assignment as a Microsoft Word document. APA format with In-text citations for references. EHR Project case described in Module 01: In order to complete this project, click on the link below to review and print the Good Apples Group Case. This document describes the Good Apples Group facility, the way they do business, and the need they have for an EHRS. Each component of the project is based on the needs of the Good Apples Group. You will be building a plan for delivering an EHRS system to Good Apples Group. Good Apples Group Case If the above link will not open, please copy and paste the link below into a browser: https://content.learntoday.info/Learn/HI300_Spring_14/site/Media/Good%20Apples%20Group%20Case.doc Rubric: Module 04 Course Project – EHR Project Plan Draft (Course Project Part 2) Criteria Points Description of overall and specific goals for the project. Place under heading GOALS OF PROJECT Description of the organization, its characteristics and climate where the project will be deployed.  Place under heading ORGANIZATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS AND CLIMATE The project plan demonstrates an understanding and application of the project management lifecycle, including all steps required to take the project from initiation through delivery, what will take place under each phase, and who will be involved. Each phase of lifecycle must be included, which are Initiation, Planning, Implementation, Closing (See below in Lesson Content for definitions).  Place under heading PROJECT LIFESTYLE PHASES. 10 Total 20 Lesson Content: Project Management Fundamentals What is a project? When considering the best approach to planning work related to the operations of a business, it is necessary to differentiate between day-to-day work (what may often be considered normal business processes) and “projects.” The reason is because project management as a methodology is uniquely designed to address the resource and risk management needs of projects. Business processes, even if they are not daily endeavors, are usually repeatable, and should be approached differently. A project, on the other hand, is a temporary endeavor that has unique and finite goals.  Examples of things that are not projects: Upgrading desktop software Entering patient records into a registration system Training nursing staff to use an existing nursing information system Examples of things that are projects: Creating a feasibility study for new radiology equipment Selecting and implementing a new scheduling tool Replacing a manual payment system with an electronic billing system What is project management? People use project management techniques to complete projects successfully. The reason why any methodology at all is needed to manage projects is because a finite endeavor such as a project is at risk of either costing too much, taking too long, or requiring too many resources (such as people.) These three factors combine to form what is known as the “triple constraint.” The triple constraint is important to consider since a change in any one of these three factors (budget, time, or resources) will directly affect the other two. For example, a shortage of people on hand to install a new computer system would mean that it would take much more time and money than it would if more were available. Good project management helps to make sure that the triple constraint is handled properly. Something that is worth considering when approaching a new project is exactly what success would mean for that project. Simply handling the balancing act within the triple constraint may get the job done, but what would it take to say that the project was done right? Does it need to be completed by a given date? Should it require only X amount of money to deliver? Many projects are started under the assumption that simply completing them will be good enough, but if a more specific measure of success can be determined, then the proper application of the project management process can ensure that success is in fact achieved. Project Scope Project scope defines how far the project will reach; it directly affects our choices regarding how to complete it. In order to define the scope of a project, one must clearly state matters such as how many people will be included, how much of the organization’s facilities will be covered, or exactly which business processes will be affected. A common problem that makes IT projects challenging is when clients change the requirements on which a project was started once the project has been set in motion. This is known as “scope creep,” and may begin with a few simple requests. Over time, however, the practice of permitting requirements to be changed or added to leads to a significant strain on the triple constraint in one way or another, eventually pushing the project towards failure. The Project Management Process The project management process provides a systematic, repeatable approach to completing projects. Because it is an approach known across many industries and by most professionals, it is easy to bring staff and contractors up to speed on its use. It’s based on phases that feed from one into the next, making each phase dependent on its predecessor. Repeated use of this same systematic process by an organization makes it possible to duplicate successes in future projects. For example, after a team has completed a project that introduces a new patient registration system, that team will likely remember what challenges they faced during each phase of the project management process. In a future project where the same team is bringing in another information system, those experiences will make it easier to avoid actions that didn’t work and to make smart choices about ones that did. The phases are: Initiation. Kicking the project off requires the project team to: Consider the feasibility of the project Clearly state the justification for the project Name everyone involved, included a project sponsor, a project manager, and the development team Launch the project publicly by announcing it to the stakeholders Planning. During the planning phase the team must: Gather the project requirements Analyze risks to the project and identify mitigation strategies for those risks Write the project management plan, including timelines and resource assignments Implementation. The meat of the project lies in the implementation phase, where the team: Builds the project based on the planning documents Monitor  the project’s progress and takes corrective actions as required Gains project acceptance Brings the stakeholders on board with the project through training and other activities Closing. To close the project the team must wrap up all the project materials and archive them for future use (this is one of the ways that teams take best advantage of repeatable processes), announce success, analyze lessons learned, and dissolve the project team. The Project Lifecycle The project management lifecycle is a well known approach to planning a project. It is based on a defined sequence of activities that will work for projects of any size or complexity. Just as important as this, however, is the fact that since it is a well known approach, new team members and project managers from anywhere in an organization will likely be familiar with the process, making it easier to get everyone up to speed on how the project will be managed. What is a project? A project is a temporary endeavor undertaken to produce a unique product or service. Characteristics of Projects: Temporary-Definitive beginning and end Unique- New undertaking unfamiliar ground What is Project Management? Project Management is the application of skills, knowledge, tools, and techniques to meet the needs and expectations of stakeholders for a project. Q: Why do we need Project Management? A: To make sure all the project’s objectives are met, and to mage the “triple constraint”. The triple constraint is the balancing act we face with all projects where the scope of the project, the time available for it, and the budget each affect one another. Triple Constraint: Increased Scope=increased time + increased cost Too Little Time= increased costs + reduced scope Limited Budget= increased time + reduced scope Role of a Project Manager Process Responsibilities: Project issues Disseminating project information Mitigating Project risk Quality Managing scope Metrics Managing the overall work plan People Responsibilities Implementing standard processes Establishing leadership skills Setting expectations Team building Communicator skills

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